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The Sisterhood

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Sisterhood

Shared

SISTERHOOD EMPOWERED

By sharing the incredible journey of womanhood through our stories, we have the opportunity to awaken others and open minds to the true power of who we are as women and what is important to us. May we uplift, may we inspire, may we strengthen our bonds through these meaningful, honest connections.
A Sisterhood Shared is a Sisterhood Empowered.

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Grid System

The default grid system utilizes 12 columns, making for a 1200px wide container. Below 800px viewport size, the columns become stacked vertically.


Two Columns with the same width

In graphic design, a grid is a structure made up of a series of intersecting straight (vertical, horizontal, and angular) or curved guide lines used to structure content. The grid serves as an armature on which a designer can organize graphic elements in a rational, easy to absorb manner. A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page, or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape.


In graphic design, a grid is a structure made up of a series of intersecting straight (vertical, horizontal, and angular) or curved guide lines used to structure content. The grid serves as an armature on which a designer can organize graphic elements in a rational, easy to absorb manner. A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page, or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape.


Three Columns with the same width

In graphic design, a grid is a structure made up of a series of intersecting straight (vertical, horizontal, and angular) or curved guide lines used to structure content. The grid serves as an armature on which a designer can organize graphic elements in a rational, easy to absorb manner.


In graphic design, a grid is a structure made up of a series of intersecting straight (vertical, horizontal, and angular) or curved guide lines used to structure content. The grid serves as an armature on which a designer can organize graphic elements in a rational, easy to absorb manner.


In graphic design, a grid is a structure made up of a series of intersecting straight (vertical, horizontal, and angular) or curved guide lines used to structure content. The grid serves as an armature on which a designer can organize graphic elements in a rational, easy to absorb manner.


Four Columns with the same width

A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page, or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape.


A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page, or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape.


A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page, or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape.


A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page, or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape.


Three Columns Different Sizes (3 + 4 + 5)

A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page.


A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page, or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape.


A grid can be use to organize graphic elements in relation to a page, in relation to other graphic elements on the page, or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape , or relation to other parts of the same graphic element or shape.


The grid system is an aid, not a guarantee. It permits a number of possible uses and each designer can look for a solution appropriate to his personal style. But one must learn how to use the grid; it is an art that requires practice.

 

 

Blog

Blog

If they only knew

If they

only knew

The Inspiration Behind If They Only Knew

Much love and admiration goes out to the many women who have inspired me over the years . . . and to the tiniest of them all, angel baby Sophia, who through her loss sparked the idea for the If They Only Knew magazine column and book series. Through sharing our moments of courage and perseverance, I hope we may all be better, stronger, kinder, and more understanding women. Through love, compassion, and a unified sisterhood, we’ll have the power to create peaceful, harmonious communities; eventually, changing the world. A Sisterhood Shared is a Sisterhood Empowered.

I would love for you to submit a “snapshot moment” of your life when you found yourself wondering . . . If They Only Knew. Please submit through the contact page (all submissions will remain anonymous).

Here is the one that kicked it all off . . .

 

Newborn baby holding his mothers finger, selective focusAngel Baby

Usually, when you are put on bed rest during pregnancy, you are hoping to save the baby from early delivery. But there was no saving my baby. I was 14 weeks along and had begun breaking the exciting news that my new husband and I were expecting our first baby. Most people thought it was insane. Our little baby would be the exclamation point on our newly combined family of nine children—five from his previous relationships and four from mine. But we hoped a bouncing baby girl—we were so sure “she” was a “she” that we named her Sophia—would bring everyone together, harmoniously.

I had been hemorrhaging off and on for several days. My midwife recommended I continue to “allow nature to take its course” and rest in bed while my body processed out the miscarriage. While my body worked to discard the tiniest of humans.

I was a working professional, leading a nonprofit and planning a large, regional event. The event was just two weeks away and I was scheduled to receive a city proclamation, on behalf of my organization’s work within the community, during a city council meeting. A city official had botched the previous years’ delivery of the honorary document, and I had let my disappointment be known, so they were expecting my presence this year.

I sat in the audience, a little shaky, waiting to be called upon. The bed rest earlier in the day had helped slow the bleeding. I had assured my husband I was okay. I tried to be brave, to not worry that I may begin hemorrhaging again, to avoid thinking of the baby. This was an important event. I was losing the baby; I wasn’t going to lose this, too.

My name was called and I was invited to speak. As I presented to the council members and a packed room of attendees, I focused on smoothing out my jittery voice, on breathing slowly in and out, on calming the booming heartbeat in my head, on presenting with confidence . . . and pulling from those deep regions of courage I knew I had in me. I then listened as the proclamation was read aloud, once again focusing on my breathing, my heartbeat, calming those nerves. I thought of the tiny dead baby inside of me, the heartbreak, the impossible task of combining a melting pot family, the death of an idealistic dream. As I looked out at the council members, as I felt the presence of a full chamber room behind me, tears burned the corners of my eyes and I wondered . . . If they only knew.

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your story

Much love and admiration goes out to the many women who have inspired me over the years … and to the tiniest of them all, angel baby Sophia, who through her loss sparked the idea for the If They Only Knew magazine column and book series. Through sharing our moments of courage and perseverance, may we all be better, stronger, kinder, and more understanding women. Through love, compassion, and a unified sisterhood, we’ll have the power to create peaceful, harmonious communities; eventually, changing the world. A Sisterhood Shared is a Sisterhood Empowered.

I would love for you to submit an anonymous “snapshot moment” of your life when you found yourself wondering … If They Only Knew. Please submit here:

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